Nimslo 3D

The Nimslo 3D is a lenticular stereo camera produced and released commercially in the early 1980s. The flash is not built-in. Instead, the Nimslo has a hot shoe for attaching a flash. Using 35mm film in 135 film format cartridges, the Nimslo can produce autostereoscopic prints, three-dimensional images that do not require any glasses or special equipment to view.  The camera works by snapping four conventional, two-dimensional photographs simultaneously, with each of its four lenses. Each image is 18 mm wide and 22mm high. There are two images in each conventional 35mm frame, meaning that 18 3-D prints can be made from a roll of 36 exposures (the photographs themselves are 3.5×4.5 inches). The Nimslo camera and special lenticular printing process was invented by Jerry Curtis Nims and Allen Kwok Wah Lo of Georgia, USA. Prior to the Nimslo’s release, there was much excitement surrounding it. The camera was to be “the third major advance in photography,” according to the Nimslo corporation, after roll film and Polaroid technology. Unfortunately, the camera sales did not do as well as the company and its investors had hoped it would.

Made by Nimslo in the early 1980s
The camera works by snapping four conventional, two-dimensional photographs simultaneously, with each of its four lenses
The flash is not built-in
The Nimslo can produce autostereoscopic prints, three-dimensional images that do not require any glasses or special equipment to view
There are two images in each conventional 35mm frame, meaning that 18 3-D prints can be made from a roll of 36 exposures

3D Photographies by @analogear (@35mmfilmroll) Pedro is an amazing portuguese photographer based in NYC. We love how he uses street sounds to finish his 3D analog photos.

Illustration by @camxatca